Trade with cattle between countries

There are specific rules that you must follow when trading in cattle or with semen, ova and embryos from cattle. The rules differ depending on whether you are trading with EU Member States or countries outside the EU. Additionally, the rules for bringing animals into Sweden and moving them out of Sweden, respectively, are different.

Bringing in cattle from other countries

Cattle from EU Member States, Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino

These rules apply to all EU Member States as well as Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino. Please note that the United Kingdom is now counted as a country outside the EU.

The establishment must be registered

Any establishment where there are cattle must be registered. If cattle are to be moved from the establishment to another EU Member State or to Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino, it is important that the establishment has been registered in good time before the animals are due to move.

This is because the Swedish Board of Agriculture must enter the information about the establishment in the EU-wide computer system Traces, which is used in connection with the transport of animals.

You must be registered to bring in animals

In order for you to be permitted to bring in animals to Sweden, you must be registered for import with the Swedish Board of Agriculture. You have to register in our e-service at least 30 business days before the expected date of the first occasion of import.

The registration is valid for 2 years from the date on which you are registered. Registration costs SEK 150.

Health certificates and diseases

The EU common health certificate, which must be used for any movement of animals within the EU, certifies that the animals do not carry very serious diseases or diseases that affect different EU regions to variable degrees. It is the responsibility of the official veterinarian in the country of dispatch to ensure that the animals comply with the requirements of the certificate.

The animals must meet the requirements of the national salmonella programme as well as the national PRRS rules which apply as of 1 September 2021 when you move new cattle into your establishment. If the animals you accept do not have the required status, they shall be isolated and tested according to the rules.

National control programme for salmonella

In accordance with the programme, cattle are to be examined for salmonella before they can be introduced to the recipient herd if they are brought in from a country which does not have a salmonella control programme which has been approved by the European Commission and which is equivalent to the Swedish salmonella control programme. Such examination should be carried out in an isolation facility at the receiving establishment. Contact us for more information.

National rules to prevent the spread of paratuberculosis

The national rules apply whether you bring animals from Swedish establishments or from establishments in other countries, but these are not entry requirements; they apply after the animals have entered Sweden, if they are animals from abroad.

The requirements differ depending on whether or not the establishment, from which the animals are coming, has a documented good status concerning paratuberculosis. Swedish establishments are considered to have a documented good status, provided that new animals are introduced in an epidemiologically safe manner. Animals that come from establishments which do not have a documented good status shall be isolated and tested, and must also be subject to follow-up testing in accordance with the requirements of the regulations.

More information about the national rules and criteria for a documented good status concerning paratuberculosis can be found on the page about diseases, hygiene rules and antibiotic resistance in cattle and in the regulations (SJVFS 2021:23).

It is important that you follow the rules on isolation and testing of animals if you bring in animals from other countries where the infection is present, as the disease has detrimental impacts on animal health as well as on production. Testing for paratuberculosis and salmonella (in cases where such testing must be carried out) may be advantageously coordinated, where in both cases the animals are to be kept in isolation.

Söker efter 2021:23

The animals must have bovine identification documents

Cattle that are coming from another EU Member State, Norway, Andorra, the Faroe Islands or Switzerland must be accompanied by identification documents. Previously, this was referred to as a cattle passport.

When the cattle have arrived at the recipient herd, you must send these identification documents to our animal registry unit in Söderhamn.

Postal address:

Jordbruksverket

826 84 Söderhamn

Plan the transport carefully

There may be areas with restrictions on the transport of cattle, due to infectious animal diseases. There may be special rules for the transport of cattle in such areas. You must ensure that you know in advance about these areas, so that the animals are not stopped somewhere along the way.

Registering the transporter for the movement of animals between countries

If you are transporting animals to or from Sweden, you must be registered as a transporter. You register as a transporter using our e-service. Please note that a registration as a transporter is not the same as the transporter’s permit required to transport animals as part of your business activities.

Bring the animals via a customs post

When you bring in cattle from EU Member States, Norway, Andorra, Switzerland or the Faroe Islands, the animals may enter only via a customs post. When the animals pass the border, you must notify the customs post in question of the import. Our recommendation is that you notify the customs post well in advance that the transport is on its way, and let them know when the transport is expected to arrive at the border.

Marking and reporting

The animals must be marked with an ID marking which is approved in the country from which the animals are coming.

Upon arrival at the receiving herd in Sweden, the animals must be additionally marked with Swedish ear tags. Previously, there was a requirement that this was done by a veterinarian, but you may now do this yourself.

Cattle which have been brought into Sweden must be reported to the central cattle registry at the latest 20 days after the animals have been tagged with Swedish ear tags.

Cattle from countries outside the EU

You are only allowed to bring cattle into Sweden from certain countries outside the EU. Contact us to find out which countries are approved.

The establishment must be registered

Any establishment where there are cattle must be registered. If cattle are to be received at the establishment from countries outside the EU, it is important that the establishment is registered in good time before the animals are received.

This is because the Swedish Board of Agriculture must enter the information about the establishment in the EU-wide computer system Traces, which is used in connection with the transport of animals.

You must be registered to bring in animals

In order for you to be permitted to bring in animals to Sweden, you must be registered for import with the Swedish Board of Agriculture. You have to register in our e-service at least 30 business days before the expected date of the first occasion of import.

The registration is valid for 2 years from the date on which you are registered. Registration costs SEK 150.

Health certificates and diseases

The EU common health certificate, which must be used for movement of animals to the EU, certifies that the animals do not carry very serious diseases or diseases that affect different EU regions to variable degrees. It is the responsibility of the official veterinarian in the country of dispatch to ensure that the animals comply with the requirements of the certificate. Sweden does not impose any additional mandatory requirements in addition to those of the EU on the country of dispatch or the dispatching establishment.

The animals must meet the requirements of the national salmonella programme as well as the national paratuberculosis rules which apply hen you move new cattle into your establishment. If the animals you accept do not have the required status, they shall be isolated and tested according to the rules.

Upon arrival at your herd, the new animals must stay in the recipient herd in Sweden for at least 30 days before they may be moved out of the herd. If the new animals are placed directly in the receiving herd and not in an isolation facility, none of the animals in the herd may be moved for 30 days after the new animals arrived.

National control programme for salmonella

In accordance with the programme, cattle are to be examined for salmonella before they can be introduced to the recipient herd if they are brought in from a country which does not have a salmonella control programme which has been approved by the European Commission and which is equivalent to the Swedish salmonella control programme. Such examination should be carried out in an isolation facility at the receiving establishment. Contact us for more information.

National rules to prevent the spread of paratuberculosis

The national rules apply whether you bring animals from Swedish establishments or from establishments in other countries, but these are not entry requirements; they apply after the animals have entered Sweden, if they are animals from abroad.

The requirements differ depending on whether or not the establishment, from which the animals are coming, has a documented good status concerning paratuberculosis. Swedish establishments are considered to have a documented good status, provided that new animals are introduced in an epidemiologically safe manner. Animals that come from establishments which do not have a documented good status shall be isolated and tested, and must also be subject to follow-up testing in accordance with the requirements of the regulations.

More information about the national rules and criteria for a documented good status concerning paratuberculosis can be found on the page about diseases, hygiene rules and antibiotic resistance in cattle and in the regulations (SJVFS 2021:23).

It is important that you follow the rules on isolation and testing of animals if you bring in animals from other countries where the infection is present, as the disease has detrimental impacts on animal health as well as on production. Testing for paratuberculosis and salmonella (in cases where such testing must be carried out) may be advantageously coordinated, where in both cases the animals are to be kept in isolation.

Söker efter 2021:23

Plan the transport carefully

There may be areas with restrictions on the transport of cattle, due to infectious animal diseases. There may be special rules for the transport of cattle in such areas. You must ensure that you know in advance about these areas, so that the animals are not stopped somewhere along the way.

Registering the transporter for the movement of animals between countries

If you are transporting animals to or from Sweden, you must be registered as a transporter. You register as a transporter using our e-service. Please note that a registration as a transporter is not the same as the transporter’s permit required to transport animals as part of your business activities.

Bring the animals in via an approved border control post

Animals from approved countries outside the EU, except for Norway, Andorra, the Faroe Islands and Switzerland, may only be brought in via an approved border control station.

When you bring in animals, you must notify the border control veterinarian at least one working day in advance of arrival to the border control post. You must also report the animals to the border control post in the Trace system via a CHED (Common Health Entry Document). The person who creates the CHED can be a private person, a company importing the animals, or a company in charge of organisation of shipping.

There is currently no border control station in Sweden that is approved to receive cattle. Therefore, you must bring the animals in via an approved border control station in another country. The transport will then be handled as an import from another EU country.

If the import takes place via another EU country, it must be reported to the border control post where the animals enter the EU.

When the animals cross the border into Sweden, you must report the entry to customs.

If the import takes place via another EU Member State, a notification must be made to the border control post where the animals will enter the EU.

When the animals pass the border into Sweden, you must register the import with the Swedish Customs.

Bring the animals in via a customs post

When the animals pass the border into Sweden, you must also register the import to the customs. Our recommendation is that you notify the customs post well in advance that the transport is on its way, and let them know when it is expected to arrive at the border.

Marking and reporting

The animals must be marked with an ID marking which is approved in the country from which the animals are coming.

Upon arrival at the receiving herd in Sweden, the animals must be additionally marked with Swedish ear tags. Previously, there was a requirement that this was done by a veterinarian, but you may now do this yourself.

Cattle which have been brought into Sweden must be reported to the central cattle registry at the latest 20 days after the animals have been tagged with Swedish ear tags.

Bringing cattle into other countries

Cattle to EU Member States, Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino

Please note that the United Kingdom is now counted as a country outside the EU.

The establishment must be registered

Any establishment where there are cattle must be registered. If cattle are to be moved from the establishment to another EU Member State or to Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino, it is important that the establishment has been registered well in advance of the transport.

This is because the Swedish Board of Agriculture must enter the information about the establishment in the EU-wide computer system Traces, which is used in connection with the transport of animals.

Health certificates

You must have contacted an official veterinarian in good time, who shall examine the animals and issue a health certificate within 24 hours prior to departure. The veterinarian must also be able to certify that the animals meet all the requirements of the health certificate. The animals must be accompanied by the original on paper. The health certificate is also sent electronically between countries through the EU's common Traces database.

There are two health certificates that are used for cattle: for breeding, or direct to slaughter. The health certificate for breeding is to be used for all animals that are not intended for immediate slaughter. This also applies to any animals that may be castrated.

The animals must have been in the dispatching establishment for at least 30 days before they can be sent to another EU Member State. The official veterinarian must certify that this is the case in the certificate. If the animals have not been in isolation, no new animals may have been added to the herd for that period.

For animals that are to be used for breeding, a zootechnical certificate must also be provided.

Travel plan

The animals must be accompanied by a travel plan during any transport which exceeds 8 hours. This travel plan is to be prepared by the official veterinarian, approved by the Swedish Board of Agriculture, and must accompany the animals.

Marking

The animals must be correctly marked for identification and the transport must be registered with the central cattle registry.

Identification documents

The animals must have bovine identification documents. Previously, this was referred to as a cattle passport. We issue these documents once you have notified us that you are bringing the animals out of Sweden. They must be available to the official veterinarian at the latest at the time of certification.

An application for identification documents must have been received by the Swedish Board of Agriculture at the latest 7 days before the animals are transported to another EU Member State. You must pay a fee of 150 SEK to the Swedish Board of Agriculture for each identification document issued.

Assembly centre

If you are sending animals from multiple herds to another country, you may need to assemble the animals. Assembly may take place via an approved assembly centre, or en route according to special rules. You must seek an approval from the Swedish Board of Agriculture, both for an assembly centre and for assembly en route. At present, there is one approved assembly centre in Sweden.

Plan the transport carefully

There may be areas with restrictions on the transport of cattle, due to infectious animal diseases. There may be special rules for the transport of cattle in such areas. You must ensure that you know in advance about these areas, so that the animals are not stopped somewhere along the way.

Registering the transporter for the movement of animals between countries

If you are transporting animals to or from Sweden, you must be registered as a transporter. You register as a transporter using our e-service. Please note that a registration as a transporter is not the same as the transporter’s permit required to transport animals as part of your business activities.

Cattle to countries outside the EU

This section describes the rules that apply when you are exporting cattle to countries outside the EU.

If the animals are going to Switzerland, Norway, Andorra or the Faroe Islands, the same rules apply as when exporting animals to another EU Member State. You can read more under the heading Cattle to EU Member States, Norway, Andorra, the Faroe Islands and Switzerland.

Find out what the rules are in the destination country

In order to export or bring animals to a country outside the EU (other than Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino), you need to find out which requirements apply in the destination country. Contact the embassy or the veterinary authorities of the destination country well in advance in order to find out:

  • Whether it is possible to travel with the animals or export them to the destination country
  • Which rules apply in the country to which the animals are travelling
  • Whether you need to apply for anything in particular, e.g. an import licence
  • Whether the animals must be quarantined or vaccinated before being transported
  • Which health certificates are required, or which requirements must be met
  • Whether any particular permit is required

Obtain a health certificate

Contact an official veterinarian well in advance to ascertain whether there is any negotiated health certificate which is valid in the country to which you are travelling or selling your animals. If there is a negotiated certificate it should be used.

If there is no negotiated certificate, you should contact the authorities in the destination country and find out which certificates they accept or what requirements must be met. If they only accept their own country's certificate, make sure your official veterinarian gets it well in advance. Never use a previously saved certificate without checking with the receiving country that the certificate is still valid and it is the latest version.

If you have only been informed about the requirements that must be met in order to be allowed to export to the country, it is you as the exporter who must write the certificate and insert the current requirements, as well as verify in writing with the recipient country that the final version is approved.

You must then give the information and the certificate to your official veterinarian in writing well in advance of the planned export.

The Swedish Board of Agriculture’s logo must not be used for a non-negotiated certificate.

The official veterinarian can always refuse to sign a health certificate if the requirements of the certificate are not met or if it is written in a language that the official veterinarian does not understand.

Please note that when a non-negotiated or general certificate is used, the export takes place at the exporter's own risk. Neither the Swedish Board of Agriculture nor the official veterinarian can provide any guarantees that the certificate will be accepted.

If applicable, submit an export application

If your export of animals must be negotiated with the authorities in the destination countries, you should submit an export application using our e-service. Once the export application has been received, negotiations with the destination country will be managed by the Swedish Board of Agriculture. Keep in mind that negotiations may take a long time (usually several years) to complete. It is not a solution for a one-time export.

The export application is primarily aimed at those who intend to export large quantities and frequently. Note that received export applications are prioritized by the Swedish Board of Agriculture.

Find out if there are any export restrictions

Before you travel with animals or export them to countries outside the EU, you need to find out if any export restrictions apply due to contagious animal diseases.

Find out what rules apply for the transport

It is also important that you find out what rules and requirements apply to the transport.

Submit a customs declaration

If you sell animals to a country outside the EU, you must submit an electronic customs declaration to the Swedish Customs.

If the animals are returning to Sweden later

If you are bringing back animals that you have previously travelled with or exported to a country outside the EU, you need to find out what rules apply.

Contact us if you have questions

You are welcome to send us an e-mail if you have any questions.

New rules for bringing animals or animal products to the United Kingdom

Here, you can find out what rules apply when you are bringing animals or animal products to the United Kingdom, but you must also read the general rules that apply when exporting to countries outside the EU.

As of 1 January 2021, new rules apply to trade with the United Kingdom. The ministry responsible for these rules is the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA). If you have any questions, please contact them.

The rules are described in the guide Border Operating Model.

The UK is implementing the new rules in several phases throughout 2021 and 2022. The conditions for exports to the United Kingdom may change, and it is therefore important that anyone carrying out exports stays up-to-date via the DEFRA’s website.

What you need to do as an exporter

Companies that are exporting to the UK need to, among other things:

  • In collaboration with the importer, find out which certificates should accompany the consignment.
  • Ensure that you have access to the web-based system Traces in order to record the details required for the certificate.
  • Check that the dispatching establishment is registered or approved, and that the transporter meets applicable requirements.
  • If the transport to the UK will pass through other EU Member States, you must also check what applies when exporting to other EU Member States.
  • Contact an official veterinarian in good time!

Health certificates and pre-registration

The importer to the UK should pre-register live animals, breeding materials and products from animals from the EU with the UK system Import of Products, Animals, Feed and Food Systems (IPAFFS). This must be done at the latest one business day prior to the expected arrival. A health certificate must always accompany the consignment. Physical controls may be carried out.

The health certificate has been developed by UK authorities and is available in the EU computer system Traces or on DEFRA’s website. It is your responsibility as an exporter to find out which certificate must be used, and for that reason it is important that you, potentially with the help of the importer, find out what is required by checking DEFRA’s website. You can also read more on their website about how the various parts of the certificate are filled in and which information is mandatory, and which is optional.

This applies to exports to the United Kingdom:

  1. The importer must register the consignment in the UK through the IPAFFS computer system
  2. The consignment will receive a unique notification number (UNN) in IPAFFS, which has the format IMP.GB.2021.1XXXXXX.
  3. A health certificate issued by an official veterinarian in Sweden must always accompany the consignment.
  4. The importer in the UK must provide the UNN number to the exporter or to the official veterinarian in Sweden, who will record the number in the health certificate.
  5. The exporter must provide the importer with an electronic copy of the health certificate so that it can be uploaded to IPAFFS.
  6. The exporter is responsible for ensuring that the original health certificate accompanies the consignment.

Bringing in semen, ova and embryos from cattle from other countries

Semen, ova and embryos from EU Member States, Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino

You may buy semen, ova and embryos from cattle from EU Member States, Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino.

Your establishment must be approved for intra-EU trade with semen, ova and embryos.

You need a permit for insemination and activities involving embryos

In order to trade with semen, ova and embryos, you must have a permit for activities involving insemination and embryos.

The semen and embryos must have been stored in an approved semen collection centre or embryo collection and production team before being imported into Sweden.

Health certificates and zootechnical certificates

The consignment has to be accompanied by an official health certificate in the original. The health certificate must be issued by an official veterinarian in the country from which the animal is coming no earlier than 24 hours before loading.

If you import semen, a zootechnical certificate must also accompany the semen.

Semen, ova and embryos from countries outside the EU

You may only import semen, ova and embryos from countries or establishments outside the EU if they are approved for import. A list of establishments in countries that are approved for import to the EU is provided on the EU’s website.

When you are importing to Sweden from countries outside the EU, other than Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino, the import must pass through an approved border control post. You must notify the veterinarian at the border control post at the latest one business day in advance.

If the import to Sweden takes place from a country outside the EU via another EU Member State, a notification for border control must be made to the border control post where the animals will enter the EU.

Bringing semen, ova and embryo from cattle to other countries

Semen, ova and embryos to EU Member States, Norway, Iceland, Northern Ireland, Switzerland, Andorra, the Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Liechtenstein, Monaco or San Marino

Your establishment must be approved for intra-EU trade with semen, ova and embryos.

You need a permit for insemination and activities involving embryos

In order to trade with semen, ova and embryos, you must have a permit for activities involving insemination and embryos.

Semen, ova and embryos to countries outside the EU

In order to export semen, ova and embryos to countries outside the EU, it is required that collection and storage was carried out at an establishment approved for these activities. Your establishment must be approved for intra-EU trade with semen, ova and embryos. You must also have a permit for activities involving insemination or embryos. The semen must come from semen collection centres which have been granted an EU approval by the Swedish Board of Agriculture.

Contact the country to which you are exporting

Please note that the export of animals requires careful preparation. Contact the embassy or the veterinary authorities of the destination country in good time in order to find out:

  • Whether it is possible to export to the country
  • Which rules apply in the country
  • Whether any particular permit is required
  • Whether you need to apply for anything in particular, e.g. an import licence
  • Which health certificates are required, or which requirements must be met

Obtain a health certificate

Contact an official veterinarian well in advance to ascertain whether there is any negotiated health certificate which is valid in the country to which you are travelling or selling your animals. If there is a negotiated certificate it should be used.

If there is no negotiated certificate, you should contact the authorities in the destination country and find out which certificates they accept or what requirements must be met. If they only accept their own country's certificate, make sure your official veterinarian gets it well in advance. Never use a previously saved certificate without checking with the receiving country that the certificate is still valid and it is the latest version.

If you have only been informed about the requirements that must be met in order to be allowed to export to the country, it is you as the exporter who must write the certificate and insert the current requirements, as well as verify in writing with the recipient country that the final version is approved.

You must then give the information and the certificate to your official veterinarian in writing well in advance of the planned export.

The Swedish Board of Agriculture’s logo must not be used for a non-negotiated certificate.

The official veterinarian can always refuse to sign a health certificate if the requirements of the certificate are not met or if it is written in a language that the official veterinarian does not understand.

Please note that when a non-negotiated or general certificate is used, the export takes place at the exporter's own risk. Neither the Swedish Board of Agriculture nor the official veterinarian can provide any guarantees that the certificate will be accepted.

If applicable, submit an export application

If your export of animals must be negotiated with the authorities in the destination countries, you should submit an export application using our e-service. Once the export application has been received, negotiations with the destination country will be managed by the Swedish Board of Agriculture. Keep in mind that negotiations may take a long time (usually several years) to complete. It is not a solution for a one-time export.

The export application is primarily aimed at those who intend to export large quantities and frequently. Note that received export applications are prioritized by the Swedish Board of Agriculture.

Find out if there are any export restrictions

Before you travel with animals or export them to countries outside the EU, you need to find out if any export restrictions apply due to contagious animal diseases.

Find out what rules apply for the transport

It is also important that you find out what rules and requirements apply to the transport.

Submit a customs declaration

If you sell semen, ova or embryos to a country outside the EU, you must submit an electronic customs declaration to the Swedish Customs.

If the semen, ova or embryos are returning to Sweden later

If you are bringing back semen, ova or embryos that you have previously travelled with or exported to a country outside the EU, you need to find out what rules apply.

Contact us if you have questions

You are welcome to send us an e-mail if you have any questions.

New rules for bringing animals or animal products to the United Kingdom

Here, you can find out what rules apply when you are bringing animals or animal products to the United Kingdom, but you must also read the general rules that apply when exporting to countries outside the EU.

As of 1 January 2021, new rules apply to trade with the United Kingdom. The ministry responsible for these rules is the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA). If you have any questions, please contact them.

The rules are described in the guide Border Operating Model.

The UK is implementing the new rules in several phases throughout 2021 and 2022. The conditions for exports to the United Kingdom may change, and it is therefore important that anyone carrying out exports stays up-to-date via the DEFRA’s website.

What you need to do as an exporter

Companies that are exporting to the UK need to, among other things:

  • In collaboration with the importer, find out which certificates should accompany the consignment.
  • Ensure that you have access to the web-based system Traces in order to record the details required for the certificate.
  • Check that the dispatching establishment is registered or approved, and that the transporter meets applicable requirements.
  • If the transport to the UK will pass through other EU Member States, you must also check what applies when exporting to other EU Member States.
  • Contact an official veterinarian in good time!

Health certificates and pre-registration

The importer to the UK should pre-register live animals, breeding materials and products from animals from the EU with the UK system Import of Products, Animals, Feed and Food Systems (IPAFFS). This must be done at the latest one business day prior to the expected arrival. A health certificate must always accompany the consignment. Physical controls may be carried out.

The health certificate has been developed by UK authorities and is available in the EU computer system Traces or on DEFRA’s website. It is your responsibility as an exporter to find out which certificate must be used, and for that reason it is important that you, potentially with the help of the importer, find out what is required by checking DEFRA’s website. You can also read more on their website about how the various parts of the certificate are filled in and which information is mandatory, and which is optional.

This applies to exports to the United Kingdom:

  1. The importer must register the consignment in the UK through the IPAFFS computer system
  2. The consignment will receive a unique notification number (UNN) in IPAFFS, which has the format IMP.GB.2021.1XXXXXX.
  3. A health certificate issued by an official veterinarian in Sweden must always accompany the consignment.
  4. The importer in the UK must provide the UNN number to the exporter or to the official veterinarian in Sweden, who will record the number in the health certificate.
  5. The exporter must provide the importer with an electronic copy of the health certificate so that it can be uploaded to IPAFFS.
  6. The exporter is responsible for ensuring that the original health certificate accompanies the consignment.

Revision date: 2023-03-14

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